Cat Training Books

Clicker training isn’t just for dogs. Cats are smart, fun, and a lot more willing to learn than their reputation sometimes makes it seem. Get started clicker training your kitties with this kit from Karen Pryor that includes a book on the basics and some great behaviors to teach, a clicker and a sample of treats.
Pam Johnson-Bennett is one of today’s best known feline behaviorists. The following few items present several of her books, in which you can find help on many different cat issues, and answers to many questions about why cats do what they do.

From basic health care to more serious behavioral issues, from training cats to use a scratching post to avoiding litter box problems this newly revised edition of Think Like a Cat covers all of a cat parent’s most pressing concerns-and solidifies its position as the topic leader for years to come.

Geared specifically for owners of adult cats, be they recently adopted or long time family pets, this book illustrates how it’s never too late to correct behavior problems. With her trademark wit and common sense, Pam covers every aspect of a cat’s lifestyle, behavior, and environment and gives cat owners specific techniques to help seemingly set-in-their-ways cats change for the better.
Adding another cat to your home does not have to be the start of a kitty apocalypse. Although cats are often misunderstood as natural loners, Johnson-Bennett shows how to plan, set up, and maintain a home environment that will help multiple cats—and their owners—live in peace.
Because cats are intelligent, they quickly understand what kind of behavior gets them a click and a reward, and they will experiment in order to find out what else might work. This manual explains what classical conditioning involves, why it works with every cat, how to avoid mistakes, and how to use rewards properly and develop chains and sequences of behavior, as well as small tricks.
In this easy-to-read beginner’s guide, Marilyn Krieger, a leading clicker-training expert, tells you how to teach your cat to: sit and stay and not dart out of doors; not scratch the furniture; have stress-free introductions to new cats; stay off the table and counters; get along better with you, your guests and other cats; have a stress free association with both the cat carrier and the trip to the veterinarian; do tricks and much more!
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